Kennesaw DUI Attorney

When you face legal challenges, you need all available advantages to position yourself for a better future. You don’t have to handle your case alone. A skilled, professional and knowledgeable law office can effectively take the right steps for you and your family.

We understand the serious impact a criminal conviction can have on a person’s life. Criminal charges and a conviction can affect your family, your friendships, your employment opportunities, your right to carry a gun and even your right to vote.

Our firm has the skills, knowledge and determination to guide you through a difficult situation and to pursue your best possible results. We offer convenient and cost-effective legal representation in a wide range of criminal defense matters. We defend against every type of criminal charge, including Traffic Offenses, DWI, Drug Crimes, Robbery, Burglary, Theft, Assault and Domestic Violence. Because criminal charges are invariably difficult to handle, we have organized our practice to make things easier for our clients.
Call Diane Cherry Today at (770) 444-3399. http://www.cherrylawoffice.com

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Before You Start Dating Again as a Single Parent…

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As a single parent, thinking about dating doesn’t just affect you; it affects your whole family. Before you start dating again, take the time to prepare yourself and your kids.

Make Taking Care of Yourself a Priority

Taking care of yourself shows self-respect, and it’s also a reflection of your personal boundaries. Think about it. The people who are willing to invest some time and energy in taking care of themselves are also willing to invest in their personal relationships, right? So make the commitment to start taking care of yourself now, and view it as good practice for the investment of time and energy you plan to make in a future dating relationship. After all, if you don’t even have time to take care of yourself at this point, how can you even think about adding another person to the mix?

Widen Your Circle of Friends

Don’t limit yourself to seeking out “dates.” Instead, make an effort to establish deeper friendships all around. Who do you know at work or from your child’s activities that you’d like to get to know better? Introduce yourself and establish a friendship. It’s doesn’t even matter if these are men or women. In reality, the relationships will enrich your life, and these new friends will also introduce you to their friends, who might be great companions.

Get Out of the House Regularly

This sounds simple, but it’s an important aspect of readying your kids for your future social life. After all, when they’re accustomed to your going out occasionally, dating won’t seem like such a shock to their routine. So don’t hesitate to hire a sitter and get out of the house. Go see a movie or browse in a bookstore – think of it as preparation for a lively social life.

Be Observant

Start paying attention to the relationships around you. What do you notice? What do you respect? What qualities do you appreciate in others? This is actually one good reason to seek out some married friends. They can help you identify not only what you’re looking for – but also what you’re not.

Talk With Your Kids About Dating

Spend some time talking with your kids about your desire to date. They have a right to know whether you’re building casual friendships or whether you really hope to get married again (or for the first time). Be honest with their questions and don’t be afraid to say, “I’m not ready to answer that at this time.” Look, your kids are your family. Of course, you can’t predict the future, but you can clue them in to your intentions. Think of your honesty at this point – before you’ve even begun to date – as a seed which will grow into their future acceptance.

Courtesy of:   Jennifer Wolf, About.com Guide
The Cherry Law Firm, P.C. has the experience to build high quality legal defense team and handles cases throughout the state of Georgia. We offer a Free Initial Consultation in every case, and our consultation process is longer than most other law firms.   If you need a dedicated advocate in any family law or criminal cases, please contact attorney Diane Cherry. (770) 444-3399 or dianecherryesq@gmail.com.
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The Cherry Law Firm for DUI Defense

Whiteboard for Cherry Law Firm Criminal Law in Kennesaw. RIGHT FIRM. RIGHT NOW.
http://www.cherrylawoffice.com
(770) 444-3399 Call Now!

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Tips for divorced parents

Co-parenting with your ex can make joint custody work for the children.
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Children and separation or divorce

Co-parenting amicably with your ex can give your children stability and a close relationship with both parents, but rarely is it easy. Letting go of the problems of co-parent relationship may be totally full of stress. Despite many challenges however, it is possible to develop a cordial working relationship with your ex for the sake of the children. With these tips, you can stay calm, remain constant, and avoid or resolve conflicts with your ex and shared custody will work.

Co-parenting after a separation or divorce

Joint custody arrangements, especially after a bitter separation, can be exhausting and exasperating. It can be extremely difficult to get past the painful history that one may have with their ex and hard to overcome any resentment that has built up. Shared decision making, which makes you interact with each other in decisions, or just talking with someone who prefers to forget may seem an impossible task. But although co-parenting is not an easy solution, it is the best way to ensure that the needs of the children are met and they are able to maintain a close relationship with both parents.

It may be useful to start thinking about your relationship with your ex as a brand new one that is entirely built on the welfare of the children and not about either one of you. This marriage may be over, but this family is not.  Do what is best for the children should be your top priority. The first step in becoming a mature, responsible co-parent is to always put the children’s needs ahead of your own.

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Georgia’s Grounds for a Divorce

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Georgia is a “no-fault” divorce state, so you can get a divorce based solely on the basis that the marriage is irretrievably broken. When a marriage is irretrievably broken, the parties are unable to resolve differences in their marriage and they feel their only option is to file for divorce. The party filing for divorce is not to blame the other party in the breakup of his marriage and not the fault of either party that are divorcing. In some cases, people may want a divorce over fairly quickly and / or feel you may annoy your spouse and could cause problems during the divorce process, if the list nothing but irretrievably broken as a ground for divorce.

One disadvantage citing irreconcilable differences as the cause of divorce is that it can cover the real reason for divorce. Although a large number of divorces end due to irreconcilable differences, there are some cases where it is the behavior of the opposing party causing problems in marriage. If someone decides to choose one of the “fault grounds” in Georgia, there are ten additional reasons for divorce that you can choose based on past behavior of your current spouse. These reasons are divided into two separate categories: behavior at the time of marriage and conduct during the marriage, as indicated below:

1. The following grounds for divorce occurred at the time of marriage of the parties:
a. Mental incapacity at the time of marriage;
b. Impotence at the time of marriage, and
c. Force, threat, coercion or fraud in obtaining the marriage;

2. The following grounds for divorce occurred after the marriage of the parties:
a. The pregnancy of the woman by a man other than her husband at the time of marriage, the husband is unknown;
b. Adultery of either party after marriage;
c. Willful and continued desertion by either party for a period of one year;
d. The conviction of either party for a crime involving moral turpitude, under which he or she is sentenced to imprisonment in a penal institution for a term of two years or more;
e. Habitual intoxication;
f. Habitual drug addiction of a controlled substance, and
g. Cruel treatment, which shall consist of the intentional infliction of pain, physical or mental, the complaining party, of which reasonably justifies apprehension of danger to life, limb or health.

There are also two other reasons for divorce, which does not correspond to any of the categories listed above. The first reason is for marriage within the prohibited degrees consanguity or affinity. The second reason is incurable mental illness. In order to claim this reason, you will have to prove that a court of competent jurisdiction has declared that the spouse is mentally ill or your spouse has been certified mentally ill by two doctors who examined him or her personally.

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What constitutes domestic violence in Georgia?

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Unfortunately, we often receive calls from potential clients who have been victims of domestic violence (family violence) or want a restraining order against a spouse or former spouse. This relief can often be obtained through the State Courts of Georgia. “Family violence” refers to the occurrence of a felony or the commission of battery, simple assault, assault, stalking, criminal damage to property, unlawful restraint, burglary of dwelling, or between past or present spouses, parents of the same child, parents and children, stepparents and stepchildren, foster parents and adopted children, or others who live or once lived in the same house.

If you have been a victim of domestic violence please remember that there are resources available to victims of family violence. In addition, when appropriate, you should consider getting a temporary restraining order for your protection and the protection of your family.

 
Your Choice for Family Law and Criminal Defense

This may be the first time you’re facing a divorce, child custody battle, spousal support or criminal charge but it’s not ours. The Cherry Law Firm, P.C.  offers you individual attention, knowledgeable guidance and experienced, aggressive representation.

Personal Guidance Through Family Transitions

Given the emotional, financial and legal impact of a divorce or criminal charge on you and your family, we work closely with you through every step of your case and even prepare you for life after your case is over.
We take steps to protect your rights and ensure you aren’t saddled with a settlement or conviction you’ll regret in the long run. We are prepared to negotiate, but are also aggressive litigators fighting for you, especially when the division of debt, marital assets and custody issues or criminal charges are involved.

Experienced, Aggressive Representation

Attorney Diane Cherry has practiced law for more than 20 years. She is an aggressive trial attorney who knows when and how to fight hard and when a more subtle approach is more appropriate.  She understands that some cases are more suitable for settlement or alternative dispute resolution, while others must be fought hard in court to the end. She has practiced in state and federal courtrooms throughout the area and have a long and successful track record.

Attorney Diane Cherry approaches legal problems by first trying to resolve them amicably without going through the time-consuming and expensive process of litigation. But if your case is one where litigation is warranted, remember that Diane Cherry is a trial lawyer who is not afraid to fight for you, and will be with you every step of the way.

Your Problems Are Now Our Problems

For more information regarding how we can help you through any family law or criminal issue, call us at 770-444-3399 or contact us by email today. Our office is conveniently located in Kennesaw, Georgia close to downtown Marietta and conveniently located in between the Cobb County and Cherokee County Courthouses and is  easily accessible to all of metro Atlanta, including Fulton, Dekalb, Paulding, Bartow and Douglas counties.

Schedule Your Consultation Today

If you are struggling with a serious family law or criminal defense issue, Diane Cherry can help you pursue a favorable outcome. Call today to speak with experienced Cobb County criminal and family law attorney, Diane Cherry.

The Cherry Law Firm, P.C.
1301 Shiloh Road, Suite 1620
Kennesaw, Georgia 30144
770-444-3399-Telephone
770-444-3376-Fax

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Divorce as it Relates to Children

Helping your kids cope with the effects of separation and divorce…

Children & Separation or Divorce

For children, divorce can be stressful, sad, and confusing. At any age, kids may feel uncertain about what life will be like, or angry at the prospect of mom and dad splitting up for good. Divorce isn’t easy, but as a parent you can make the process and its effects less painful for your children.

Helping your kids cope with your divorce means providing stability in your home and attending to your children’s physical and emotional needs with a reassuring, positive attitude. To make this happen, you’ll need to take care of yourself—and work as peacefully as possible with your ex. It won’t be a seamless process, but your children can move forward feeling confident in your unconditional love.

In This Article:

  • Supporting your child
  • What to tell your kids
  • Listen and offer reassurance
  • Provide stability and structure
  • Take care of yourself
  • Work with your ex
  • Know when to seek help
  • Related articles & resources

A parent’s guide to supporting your child through a divorce

As a parent, it’s normal to feel uncertain about how to give your children the right support through your divorce or separation. It may be uncharted territory, but you can successfully navigate this unsettling time—and help your kids emerge from it feeling loved, confident, and strong.

There are many ways you can help your kids adjust to separation or divorce. Your patience, reassurance, and listening ear can minimize tension as children learn to cope with new circumstances. By providing routines kids can rely on, you remind children they can count on you for stability, structure, and care. And if you can maintain a working relationship with your ex, you can help kids avoid the stress that comes with watching parents in conflict. Such a transitional time can’t be without some measure of hardship, but you can powerfully reduce your children’s pain by making their well-being your top priority.

What I need from my mom and dad: A child’s list of wants

  • I need both of you to stay involved in my life. Please write letters, make phone calls, and ask me lots of questions. When you don’t stay involved, I feel like I’m not important and that you don’t really love me.
  • Please stop fighting and work hard to get along with each other. Try to agree on matters related to me. When you fight about me, I think that I did something wrong and I feel guilty.
  • I want to love you both and enjoy the time that I spend with each of you. Please support me and the time that I spend with each of you. If you act jealous or upset, I feel like I need to take sides and love one parent more than the other.
  • Please communicate directly with my other parent so that I don’t have to send messages back and forth.
  • When talking about my other parent, please say only nice things, or don’t say anything at all. When you say mean, unkind things about my other parent, I feel like you are expecting me to take your side.
  • Please remember that I want both of you to be a part of my life. I count on my mom and dad to raise me, to teach me what is important, and to help me when I have problems.

Source: University of Missouri

Helping children cope with divorce: What to tell your kids

When it comes to telling your kids about your divorce, many parents freeze up. Make the conversation a little easier on both yourself and your children by preparing significantly before you sit down to talk. If you can anticipate tough questions, deal with your own anxieties ahead of time, and plan carefully what you’ll be telling them, you will be better equipped to help your children handle the news.

What to say and how to say it

Difficult as it may be to do, try to strike an empathetic tone and address the most important points right up front. Give your children the benefit of an honest—but kid-friendly—explanation.

  • Tell the truth. Your kids are entitled to know why you are getting a divorce, but long-winded reasons may only confuse them. Pick something simple and honest, like “We can’t get along anymore.” You may need to remind your children that while sometimes parents and kids don’t always get along, parents and kids don’t stop loving each other or get divorced from each other.
  • Say “I love you.” However simple it may sound, letting your children know that your love for them hasn’t changed is a powerful message. Tell them you’ll still be caring for them in every way, from fixing their breakfast to helping with homework.
  • Address changes. Preempt your kids’ questions about changes in their lives by acknowledging that some things will be different now, and other things won’t. Let them know that together you can deal with each detail as you go.

Avoid blaming

It’s vital to be honest with your kids, but without being critical of your spouse. This can be especially difficult when there have been hurtful events, such as infidelity, but with a little diplomacy, you can avoid playing the blame game.

  • Present a united front. As much as you can, try to agree in advance on an explanation for your separation or divorce—and stick to it.
  • Plan your conversations. Make plans to talk with your children before any changes in the living arrangements occur. And plan to talk when your spouse is present, if possible.
  • Show restraint. Be respectful of your spouse when giving the reasons for the separation.

How much information to give

Especially at the beginning of your separation or divorce, you’ll need to pick and choose how much to tell your children. Think carefully about how certain information will affect them.

  • Be age-aware. In general, younger children need less detail and will do better with a simple explanation, while older kids may need more information.
  • Share logistical information. Do tell kids about changes in their living arrangements, school, or activities, but don’t overwhelm them with the details.
  • Keep it real. No matter how much or how little you decide to tell your kids, remember that the information should be truthful above all else.

Helping children cope with divorce: Listen and reassure

Support your children by helping them express emotions, and commit to truly listening to these feelings without getting defensive. Your next job is reassurance—assuaging fears, straightening misunderstandings, and showing your unconditional love. The bottom line: kids need to know that your divorce isn’t their fault.

Help kids express feelings

For kids, divorce can feel like loss: the loss of a parent, the loss of the life they know. You can help your children grieve and adjust to new circumstances by supporting their feelings.

  • Listen. Encourage your child to share their feelings and really listen to them. They may be feeling sadness, loss or frustration about things you may not have expected.
  • Help them find words for their feelings. It’s normal for children to have difficulty expressing their feelings. You can help them by noticing their moods and encouraging them to talk.
  • Let them be honest. Children might be reluctant to share their true feelings for fear of hurting you. Let them know that whatever they say is okay. If they aren’t able to share their honest feelings, they will have a harder time working through them.
  • Acknowledge their feelings. You may not be able to fix their problems or change their sadness to happiness, but it is important for you to acknowledge their feelings rather than dismissing them. You can also inspire trust by showing that you understand.

Clearing up misunderstandings

Many kids believe that they had something to do with the divorce, recalling times they argued with their parents, received poor grades, or got in trouble. You can help your kids let go of this misconception.

  • Set the record straight. Repeat why you decided to get a divorce. Sometimes hearing the real reason for your decision can help.
  • Be patient. Kids may seem to “get it” one day and be unsure the next. Treat your child’s confusion or misunderstandings with patience.
  • Reassure. As often as you need to, remind your children that both parents will continue to love them and that they are not responsible for the divorce.

Give reassurance and love

Children have a remarkable ability to heal when given the support and love they need. Your words, actions, and ability to remain consistent are all important tools to reassure your children of your unchanging love.

  • Both parents will be there. Let your kids know that even though the physical circumstances of the family unit will change, they can continue to have healthy, loving relationships with both of their parents.
  • It’ll be okay. Tell kids that things won’t always be easy, but that they will work out. Knowing it’ll be all right can provide incentive for your kids to give a new situation a chance.
  • Closeness. Physical closeness—in the form of hugs, pats on the shoulder, or simple proximity—has a powerful way of reassuring your child of your love.
  • Be honest. When kids raise concerns or anxieties, respond truthfully. If you don’t know the answer, say gently that you aren’t sure right now, but you’ll find out and it will be okay.

Helping children cope with divorce: Provide stability and structure

While it’s good for kids to learn to be flexible, adjusting to many new things at once can be very difficult. Help your kids adjust to change by providing as much stability and structure as possible in their daily lives.

Remember that establishing structure and continuity doesn’t mean that you need rigid schedules or that mom and dad’s routines need to be exactly the same. But creating some regular routines at each household and consistently communicating to your children what to expect will provide your kids with a sense of calm and stability.

The comfort of routines

The benefit of schedules and organization for younger children is widely recognized, but many people don’t realize that older children appreciate routine, as well. Kids feel safer and more secure when they know what to expect next. Knowing that, even when they switch homes, dinnertime is followed by a bath and then homework, for example, can set a child’s mind at ease.

Maintaining routine also means continuing to observe rules, rewards, and discipline with your children. Resist the temptation to spoil kids during a divorce by not enforcing limits or allowing them to break rules.

Helping children cope with divorce: Take care of yourself

Your own recovery

If you are able to be calm and emotionally present, your kids will feel more at ease. The following are steps you can take toward improving your own well-being and outlook:

  • Exercise often and eat a healthy diet. Exercise relieves the pent-up stress and frustration that are commonplace with divorce. And although cooking for one can be difficult, eating healthfully will make you feel better, inside and out—so skip the fast food.
  • See friends often. It may be tempting to hole up and not see friends and family who will inevitably ask about the divorce—but the reality is that you need the distraction. Ask friends to avoid the topic; they’ll understand.
  • Keep a journal. Writing down your feelings, thoughts, and moods can help you release tension, sadness, and anger. As time passes, you can look back on just how far you’ve come.

You’ll need support

At the very least, divorce is complicated and stressful—and can be devastating without support.

  • Lean on friends. Talk to friends or a support group about your bitterness, anger, frustration—whatever the feeling may be—so you don’t take it out on your kids.
  • Never vent negative feelings to your child. Whatever you do, do not use your child to talk it out like you would with a friend.
  • Keep laughing. Try to inject humor and play into your life and the lives of your children as much as you can; it can relieve stress and give you all a break from sadness and anger.
  • See a therapist. If you are feeling intense anger, fear, grief, shame, or guilt, find a professional to help you work through those feelings.

Helping children cope with divorce: Work with your ex

Conflict between parents—separated or not—can be very damaging for kids. It’s crucial to avoid putting your children in the middle of your fights, or making them feel like they have to choose between you.

 Rules of thumb

Remember that your goal is to avoid lasting stress and pain for your children. The following tips can save them a lot of heartache.

  • Take it somewhere else. Never argue in front of your children, whether it’s in person or over the phone. Ask your ex to talk another time, or drop the conversation altogether.
  • Use tact. Refrain from talking with your children about details of their other parent’s behavior. It’s the oldest rule in the book: if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.
  • Be nice. Be polite in your interactions with your ex-spouse. This not only sets a good example for your kids but can also cause your ex to be gracious in response.
  • Look on the bright side. Choose to focus on the strengths of all family members. Encourage children to do the same.
  • Work on it. Make it a priority to develop an amicable relationship with your ex-spouse as soon as possible. Watching you be friendly can reassure children and teach problem-solving skills as well.

The big picture

If you find yourself, time after time, locked in battle with your ex over the details of parenting, try to step back and remember the bigger purpose at hand.

  • Relationship with both parents. What’s best for your kids in the long run? Having a good relationship with both of their parents throughout their lives.
  • The long view. If you can keep long-term goals—your children’s physical and mental health, your independence—in mind, you may be able to avoid disagreements about daily details. Think ahead in order to stay calm.
  • Everyone’s well-being. The happiness of your children, yourself, and, yes, even your ex, should be the broad brushstrokes in the big picture of your new lives after divorce.

Helping children cope with divorce: Know when to seek help

Some children go through divorce with relatively few problems, while others have a very difficult time. It’s normal for kids to feel a range of difficult emotions, but time, love, and reassurance should help them to heal. If your kids remain overwhelmed, though, you may need to seek professional help.

Normal reactions to separation and divorce

Although strong feelings can be tough on kids, the following reactions can be considered normal for children.

  • Anger. Your kids may express their anger, rage, and resentment with you and your spouse for destroying their sense of normalcy.
  • Anxiety. It’s natural for children to feel anxious when faced with big changes in their lives.
  • Mild depression. Sadness about the family’s new situation is normal, and sadness coupled with a sense of hopelessness and helplessness is likely to become a mild form of depression.

It will take some time for your kids to work through their issues about the separation or divorce, but you should see gradual improvement over time.

Red flags for more serious problems

If things get worse rather than better after several months, it may be a sign that your child is stuck in depression, anxiety, or anger and could use some additional support. Watch for these warning signs of divorce-related depression or anxiety:

  • Sleep problems
  • Poor concentration
  • Trouble at school
  • Drug or alcohol abuse
  • Self-injury, cutting, or eating disorders
  • Frequent angry or violent outbursts
  • Withdrawal from loved ones
  • Refusal of loved activities

Discuss these or other divorce-related warning-signs with your child’s doctor, teachers, or consult a child therapist for guidance on coping with specific problems.

Reported Via: http://www.helpguide.org

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Divorce: How soon do I need to hire a lawyer?

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As a Metro Atlanta divorce lawyer for families, The Cherry Law Firm fields as many calls from people who have been served a petition for “divorce” as those who have contemplated divorce. Often, people make the call in a couple of weeks after service of process and after veiled threats that the other spouse has “only 30 days to sign or otherwise.” This can cause the lawyer to rush the client and the client into frantic fear.

It is very important that you contact a lawyer as soon as you have been served “divorce papers.” A petition for divorce or dissolution of marriage must be formally responded by filing a response and / or counterclaim within 30 days of service. If no response is submitted, the filing spouse is entitled to file for breach of this form and may, at this point set the Final Hearing of divorce after another 30 days.

Now, after all those words and legal requirements, how fast you really need a lawyer comes down to what kind of divorce you really have.

A true uncontested divorce:  If you and your spouse have looked at and decided on divorce, if you both agree to negotiate and settle all the terms of dissolution of marriage agreement and set a plan of permanent parenting, and if there is not any question of support or the Division of Property.

An uncontested divorce potential or in other words, a potentially controversial divorce:   If you and your spouse are contemplating divorce, but your spouse has already sought legal advice and legal representation and has served you with “divorce papers” that you may or may not be able to agree upon a settlement.

You should seek legal advice and legal representation within 30 days of receipt in order to preserve your legal rights if the matter becomes a contested divorce. Once you’ve hired one of our Atlanta Metro divorce lawyers to represent you, then you would submit all necessary answers and contact opposing counsel.  If unable to resolve your problems according to an agreement, then the next step is to use mediation to resolve any issues in controversy.

A contested divorce true … If you and your spouse have not discussed or agreed on divorce, your spouse has filed for divorce and can not agree to any settlement agreement. You should seek independent legal advice and legal representation immediately to preserve your rights and prepare for the long and costly process of divorce litigation.

In short, it is best for you to hire a lawyer as soon as you have been served “divorce papers” in order to preserve and represent your rights.

When your life has been turned upside down by outside circumstances, you need a strong voice to stand up for your rights and see to it that justice is served.

At The Cherry Law Firm, P.C., of Kennesaw, Georgia, you will find that strong voice, and it belongs to attorney Diane Cherry. Diane and the rest of the firm share a powerful commitment to helping people in their time of need. (770) 444-3399

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Check the Credentials of Your Cobb County Divorce Attorney

Diane Cherry, Esquire

Name: Diane Cherry
Practice In: Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Personal Injury
Location: 1301 Shiloh Road
Suite 1620
Kennesaw, GA 30144Directions
Phone: 770-444-3399
Fax: 770-444-3376
www.cherrylawoffice.com
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Complete
This attorney accepts credit card.
This attorney provides free consultation.

Introduction:
Your Choice for Family Law and Criminal Defense

This may be the first time you’re facing a divorce, child custody battle, spousal support or criminal charge but it’s not ours. The Cherry Law Firm, P.C.  offers you individual attention, knowledgeable guidance and experienced, aggressive representation.

Personal Guidance Through Family Transitions

Given the emotional, financial and legal impact of a divorce or criminal charge on you and your family, we work closely with you through every step of your case and even prepare you for life after your case is over.
We take steps to protect your rights and ensure you aren’t saddled with a settlement or conviction you’ll regret in the long run. We are prepared to negotiate, but are also aggressive litigators fighting for you, especially when the division of debt, marital assets and custody issues or criminal charges are involved.

Experienced, Aggressive Representation

Attorney Diane Cherry has practiced law for more than 20 years. She is an aggressive trial attorney who knows when and how to fight hard and when a more subtle approach is more appropriate.  She understands that some cases are more suitable for settlement or alternative dispute resolution, while others must be fought hard in court to the end. She has practiced in state and federal courtrooms throughout the area and have a long and successful track record.

Attorney Diane Cherry approaches legal problems by first trying to resolve them amicably without going through the time-consuming and expensive process of litigation. But if your case is one where litigation is warranted, remember that Diane Cherry is a trial lawyers who is not afraid to fight for you, and will be with you every step of the way.

Your Problems Are Now Our Problems

For more information regarding how we can help you through any family law or criminal issue, call us at 770-444-3399 or contact us by email today. Our office is conveniently located in Kennesaw, Georgia close to downtown Marietta and conveniently located in between the Cobb County and Cherokee County Courthouses and is  easily accessible to all of metro Atlanta, including Fulton, Dekalb, Paulding, Bartow and Douglas counties.

Schedule Your Consultation Today

If you are struggling with a serious family law or criminal defense issue, Diane Cherry can help you pursue a favorable outcome. Call today to speak with experienced Cobb County criminal and family law attorney, Diane Cherry.

The Cherry Law Firm, P.C.
1301 Shiloh Road, Suite 1620
Kennesaw, Georgia 30144
770-444-3399-Telephone
770-444-3376-Fax

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Facebook noted in one-third of divorce cases, the survey shows

The Cherry Law Firm

The Facebook phenomenon has become commonplace: a long marriage grown stale through gestures that have become routine and stress of parenting. An old flame appears on Facebook. Innocent flirting ensues. Next thing you realize, you have divorce papers in your hands. What happened?

Online Friendship Gone Awry

A new survey by the UK based on Divorce-Online site reported that Facebook played a role in one out of three divorces in 2011 there.

The 2009 survey showed Divorce-Online 20 percent, so the number seems to be increasing. A figure widely circulated in news reports last year suggested that Facebook played a role in the testimony during one of every five divorces in the States.

“In fact,” states Diane Cherry, Esq., “People will tell me that they have separated because a spouse was on Facebook all the time, although there was no suspicion of betrayal.”

The survey lists the top three reasons for Facebook emerged in the divorce petitions (surprise! secondary Boyfriend does not make the list):

Inappropriate messages to members of the opposite sex on the site.
Separated spouses are apt to posting nasty comments on the other ones’ page.
Facebook friends report the behavior of a spouse. (Maybe a little deviated from the “norm”.)

About Last Night. . .

Obtaining a divorce is not as simple as packing up your things and move to your old bachelor/bachelorette pad. First, it is necessary to agree with your spouse about how to divide property and children, and if you can not reach agreement, then have a judge review the circumstances. That’s where the story of Facebook can turn against you.

“Facebook pages and messages are very commonly used as evidence in divorce cases,” says Ms. Cherry.  One should know better than to post drunk photos with the children in the background (at least not in the South, ha).

Not the kind of photos you want to bring before the court, but once they are loose on the Internet, they are “fair game”.

Do not shoot the messenger

A survey conducted last year by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers found 81 percent of divorce lawyers report social media as a growing source of evidence in divorce cases, including 66 percent of respondents said that Facebook was the main source of evidence of social media.

A spokesman for Facebook stated in a previous article, “It is ridiculous to suggest that Facebook leads to divorce. Whether you’re breaking, or just join Facebook is only a way to communicate, such as letters, phone calls and emails. Facebook does not cause divorces, people do. “

Profile of Diane Cherry (770) 444-3399

Attorney Diane Cherry brings over twenty years of experience to The Cherry Law Firm, P.C., including criminal law, family law and civil litigation.  Diane Cherry, founder of The Cherry Law Firm, P.C. has been practicing law in the Metro Atlanta area since 1992. Attorney Cherry is a tenacious trial attorney, a reasonable but practical negotiator, and a truly compassionate family law and criminal defense attorney, who knows how to get results.
Attorney Diane Cherry maintains a general civil and criminal litigation practice, with a heavy emphasis on family law and criminal defense. The criminal practice runs the gamut of state and federal crimes from misdemeanors and traffic offenses to drug possession and DUIs, while her family law practices ranges from simple uncontested divorces to complex litigation involving child custody and millions of dollars worth of assets.

In addition to experience, when you choose The Cherry Law Firm, P.C. you are choosing to work with an attorney and staff who still believe in providing personal, one-on-one service that goes well beyond the norm. We truly care about our clients, and we believe that this fact is evident in the manner in which we serve them.

Contact  attorney Diane Cherry today to schedule a free initial consultation regarding your case.  Our office hours are Monday – Friday 8:30 – 5:00pm. Evening and weekend appointments are available as needed to suit your busy schedule.

Located in Kennesaw, Georgia, family law attorney Diane Cherry of The Cherry Law Firm, P.C., serves the Atlanta metro area, including Cobb County, Douglas County, Fulton County, Cherokee County, DeKalb County, Paulding County, Bartow County,  and Gwinnett County, Georgia.

Education:
J.D., Temple University School of Law, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1988
B.A., New York University,  1983

Admissions:
Georgia State and Superior Courts (1992)
United States District Court, Northern District of  Georgia (1979)
United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit (1986)

Professional Associations/Memberships/Affiliations:
Cobb County Bar Association
Georgia Bar Association, (Family Law and Criminal Law Sections)
Certified Guardian Ad Litem
Certified Special Master
Georgia Justice Foundation, Volunteer Lawyer
Atlanta Legal Aid, Volunteer Lawyer
Families First, Volunteer Lawyer
National Women’s Law Center, Volunteer Lawyer
Cobb County Family Law Workshop, Volunteer Presenter
Cobb Library Foundation, Past President (2010-2012)

(770) 444-3399 Call for a free appointment.  www.cherrylawoffice.com

Posted in acworth attorney, Atlanta Attorney, Atlanta Lawyer, Attorney, cartersville divorce, cheating spouse ga, cherokee county divorce attorney, child custody, child support, Cobb County Divorce, divorce, divorce lawyer, Facebook, family law, kennesaw divorce, legal help, marietta divorce, marietta lawyer, separation, support | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment